Hello, I'm Charlie Becker from LA Trikke Shop. If you've got questions about the Trikke-ing experience or which model might be best for you, 
   I'm the guy to call
  (323-363-5621).
I've been Trikke-ing for nearly 4 years and it has changed my life. So, if you're in the Los Angeles area (or even if you're not, we've helped people in Texas, Tennessee, Germany and many other places) give me a call to answer any and all questions. 
I love to talk Trikke.


‪How does the Trikke electric Tribred compare to Segway?‬
posted ‪Jun 12, 2010 9:43 AM‬ by Cord Pereira   [ updated ‪Jul 22, 2010 12:03 PM‬ ]

The following observations are from a test with a mall security company who currently use Segway and are considering Trikke.
§  TRIKKE IS MUCH EASIER TO LEARN HOW TO RIDE.
Segway’s training with IPC guards takes 12 hours. Trikke training is less than two hours.
§  TRIKKE IS MUCH EASIER TO STOP
Trikke has brakes whereas Segway relies on balance to stop.
§  TRIKKE RIDES BETTER UP RAMPS
A function of Trikke’s “dynamic suspension” which keeps riders upright on uneven surfaces.
§  TRIKKE IS A MORE COMFORTABLE RIDE OVER LONG PERIODS OF TIME
On a Segway, the riders feet often go numb after an hour of straight riding, causing them to take breaks from riding (and losing patrol time).  After three hours of straight riding on a Trikke officers were still comfortable.
§  TRIKKE IS MORE AFFORDABLE
§  TRIKKE’S BATTERY SYSTEM IS SUPERIOR
Segway’s battery is hard to change and takes a lot of time. Trikke’s hot swappable system is instant. 
§  TRIKKE IS LIGHTER WEIGHT THAN A SEGWAY
One person can handle loading/unloading a Trikke whereas a Segway requires two people
§  TRIKKE IS SAFER BECAUSE OF THREE POINTS OF CONTACT (WHEELS)
Some security guards refused to ride the Segway because they were afraid. Those same guards had no problem riding the Trikke.
§  TRIKKE IS EASILY ADJUSTABLE TO THE RIDER’S HEIGHT
Trikke’s handlebar goes up/down easily to match to the rider whereas some Segways are one size fits all, and the models that are adjustable are difficult to adjust.
§  TRIKKE IS SUPERIOR FOR PARKING PATROL AND ENFORCEMENT
Segways are not allowed to go between cars in the parking lot because the vehicles were regularly damaged and causing damage.  Trikke will be allowed to go between vehicles and providing for better parking lot coverage.
§  TRIKKE IS MORE MOBILE
Segways are not allowed to go up/down stairs/escalators in the mall.  After seeing how easy it is to mount/dismount on a Trikke and walk up/down stairs and escalators, the Trikke is now permitted for this use.  This allows guards to cover more territory instead of having to find elevators.
§  THE TRIKKE IS FOLDABLE AND PORTABLE AND CAN GO FROM MOBILE TO A RAPID DEPLOYMENT IN SECONDS.  
Segways can’t.
§  SEGWAY IS PLAGUED WITH MAINTENANCE ISSUES
One Segway has been at a repair shop for over a month.  The Trikke is easy to maintain.
§  SEGWAYS ARE KEYED FOR SPEED
Segways require specific “keys” that program the vehicle to go a certain speed.  When the keys are lost, replacement keys cost $200.  Not so for the Trikke.
§  TRIKKE “LOOKS COOLER” THAN A SEGWAY
The mall renamed the Trikke unit to “Death Star 1”.

TRIBRED PON-E 48V Personal Transporter
323-363-5621
Obesity and exercise: Debbie Bumgardner drops the yo-yo diet, picks up a Trikke
The frustrated dieter bought the odd vehicle after seeing it on an infomercial. 
Now she's speeding down bike paths.
Debbie Bumgardner was an overworked 52-year-old legal secretary and frustrated yo-yo dieter from Tarzana who'd gradually cut back on tennis and biking over the years. By early 2010, she was 100 pounds overweight.

A year later, Bumgardner is still overworked and stressed-out. But she's 70 pounds lighter, which she attributes almost entirely to Trikking.

A Trikke (pronounced "trike") is a three-wheeled vehicle with foot platforms and upright handlebars that you propel in a standing position by shifting body weight from side-to-side, as if carving "S" turns while skiing. Priced from $200 to $500, depending on size and wheel type, the device was originally targeted at teenagers and twentysomethings who could use it for aerial acrobatics and extreme downhills when it came out in 2004. But most buyers turned out to be sedentary middle-agers attracted to the flowing, non-impact, all-body movement, according to John Simpson, president of Trikke Tech Inc. in Buellton, Calif.

Bumgardner fits the profile to a T. "I was tired of feeling uncomfortable and sluggish, and was ready to start exercising when I saw it on an infomercial," she says. The fact that it offered a full-body workout and didn't require her to bend over, as did a bicycle, prompted her to buy one for her birthday.

"I didn't know what I was getting into — like how to work it," she said. "But it didn't take long, and it is such a blast that it keeps me coming back every night."

She means that literally. When she returns home from work at 7 or 7:30 p.m., Bumgardner no longer plops on the couch in exhaustion but hops on her Trikke and heads for the well-lighted bike path next to the Orange Line busway. She usually rides an hour, even in the dark of winter.

"Little kids see me and say, 'That's cool,' but it's the older folks who say, 'That looks like a good workout.'" she said. "And it is a powerful workout — push it, pull it, lift it, lean it, spring it forward, all at once. But you don't notice your heart rate is through the roof because it's so much fun." On Saturdays, she often does a two-hour, 14-mile excursion to the Sepulveda Dam and back.

The Trikke has led to other lifestyle changes. She's overhauled her diet and reconnected with old passions. "Before the Trikke, my feet and my joints hurt even from walking. But now I'll go for a brisk walk on rainy days." She's also begun strength training at home and dusted off her old tennis racket.

Her social life has revved up too. Bumgardner recently acquired a local Trikking buddy and has joined the South Bay Trikkers for rides on beachfront bike paths. "Everyone has the same story: 'This is so fun that I want to keep doing it.'"
Copyright © 2011, Los Angeles Times
By Roy M. Wallack, Special to the Los Angeles Times
April 11, 2011
Q. So where did she get her Trikke T8 Sport Matte Black  3 Wheeled Cambering Exercise Vehicle ?
A. LA TRIKKE SHOP 323-363-5621